Posts tagged: kenny dalglish

Kenny Dalglish: A Breakup of the Worst Kind

By , May 17, 2012 10:45 am

Disappointed. Saddened. Confused. Surprised. All these emotions and more were felt immediately following the news that Kenny Dalglish had been sacked by Liverpool Football Club. While the fans can’t seem to agree on anything these days, I imagine a great majority felt the same way I did. Whether the decision proves to be the correct one remains to be seen. But right now, it just feels like an agonizing, soul-crushing breakup.

Goodbye, Kenny. Thanks For Everything, Always And Forever

You know the kind I’m talking about. Where there are lots of wonderful things about the other person, things you adore and wouldn’t change for the world. Such as Kenny’s undying love and affection for Liverpool, the institution, and the fans. His passion and electric smile on view every time Liverpool scored a goal. His pure outpouring of emotion when Liverpool reached and subsequently won the Carling Cup final. And most of all, the way you just knew that he, of all people on the planet, understood the fabric of the club like no one else. Since his arrival in the late 1970′s, the process of weaving the club’s DNA into his own had begun. And it continues to this day despite his unfortunate dismissal.

But with the good in someone you love, there are also a handful of things you find difficult to understand, and even dislike. While I believed in Kenny throughout the season, there’s no denying the league position was not good enough. Sometimes his tactics seemed strange. His substitutions would come too late, or not come at all. His squad selection was often baffling as several players were off-form, but still chosen ahead of others who had more to offer. And while I appreciated his surly demeanor with the press, the press obviously did not. And so the smearing began and continued throughout the season, culminating with the crescendo that was the Suarez/Evra debacle.

Despite all this, I trusted Kenny to get things right. And sporadically throughout the league campaign, and 99% of the time in the cups, he did get it right. Many forget that he was working with a team that had several new players, several young players, and that he lost his best central midfielder for almost the entire season with no suitable replacement. The woodwork, lack of clinical finishing, and lengthy suspensions and other injuries affecting the other world class quality in the team all lead to a dismaying league campaign to say the least. But anyone that doesn’t think Liverpool often didn’t get what they deserved based on their overall play throughout the season, wasn’t actually watching the games. In many cases, it was small margins between winning and losing, which can almost be worse and infinitely more frustrating than overall dire displays and performances. While the old saying goes “the buck stops with the manager,” I think the players should take a sizable amount of responsibility for the results in the league. After all, Kenny couldn’t run out onto the pitch and score goals for them, as much as we all would have loved to have seen that.

Like a breakup, sometimes you know when it is time to call it quits. Other times, you feel in your heart it deserves one last go before throwing it all in. I felt the latter. My head understood the reasons for dismissing Dalglish, but my heart believed he had more to offer. Another chance, a bit more time, and things would turn around. And if not, then you would at least know for sure it was time to part ways, however painful that may be.

FSG didn’t see things quite the same way I did. They operated with their minds, and their wallets, in performing a cold, calculated separation as soon as the season ended. Their hearts were not involved and how could we expect them to be? They may know business, but they don’t know enough about Liverpool Football Club to truly understand what a breakup of this magnitude would do to the fans of this great institution.

As with any breakup with someone you still love despite knowing they just aren’t right for you deep inside, it hurts to see them go. You start to think about how you’ll never spend the afternoon with them, share an inside joke, or lie next to them at night. As a loyal and emotional Liverpool fan, it hurts to think of how I won’t get to see Kenny’s goal celebrations, his beaming smile, and utter unbridled elation at seeing his team succeed while putting an arm around their shoulder when they fail.

Other clubs, other fans, and the media will never understand what Kenny Dalglish means to Liverpool and to Liverpool fans. The breakup might be best for our future, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t hurt. And to read Dalglish’s own gracious words describing how he wants the fans to be happy with whoever their new manager is, just makes it hurt even more. Because you know he means it. He loves us, perhaps like no other manager can possibly do, so he can truly let us go and wish us only the best.

I hope all fans, no matter if they were for or against Dalglish’s sacking, can understand what the man gave to this team, not just in the distant past, but in the more recent past as well. He united the club after a period of great turmoil and disillusion. He brought us a trophy, three trips to Wembley, and some of the best performances individually and collectively that we’ve seen in years. But more than anything, Dalglish deserves the best in his future just as he wishes that on us. We may never be together as we once were, but Liverpool and its fans will always love Dalglish. I just hope he knows that.

Liverpool: Two Steps Forward, One Step Back

By , March 4, 2012 11:57 am

After the ecstasy of the Carling Cup victory last Sunday, Liverpool once again felt the agony the following weekend with defeat to Arsenal. It would seem that every time Liverpool appear to finally be clicking and on their way to a run of successive positive performances and/or wins, they continue to mystify the manager and fans with displays in which they are either dire (think back to Bolton) or unlucky combined with poor finishing (Arsenal, Norwich, United, etc.). Miss penalty, hit post, opposition keeper has a blinder, create chance after chance without scoring, rinse, repeat. This has been the short and sweet illustration of Liverpool’s season thus far.

There is no doubt amongst knowledgeable supporters just how much progress has been achieved in a little over a year since Kenny Dalglish returned as manager. And despite some poor results, poor performances, and results that just wouldn’t swing our way, anyone that thinks we haven’t taken major strides forward is deluded. The style of play since the second half of last season has been mostly excellent. The game against Arsenal was a perfect example of Liverpool demonstrating how they can completely dominate a team with movement, quick passing, and the right balance of players in the side.

Liverpool's Victory in the Carling Cup Was Meant To Propel Them Into the Top Four

Suarez was particularly on form against the gunners, while Dirk Kuyt was back to his old self, combining with Suarez and Kelly on the right extremely well. I for one was overjoyed to see Jordan Henderson in his preferred central role as he once again showed that is his best position. He had an excellent game and was voted Man of the Match by Liverpool.

I was also very pleased to see Spearing reinstated to the side. With Gerrard unavailable through injury, it was no surprise to see a central three of Spearing, Henderson, and Adam, but to me Spearing is essential in these games, especially with the continued absence of the much missed Lucas. With him allowed to cover the back four, whatever combination of Adam, Gerrard, and Henderson can feel free to do what they do best ahead of him.

I don’t think anyone would disagree with the assessment that the central pairing of Gerrard and Adam has been just shy of disastrous at times. Neither are deep lying defensive midfielders and neither wants the role. When they play together, there is a massive gap between them and defense which has left the team alarmingly vulnerable. Spearing in my opinion has done more than enough to earn a place in the side, and if someone must be sacrificed, it should be Adam.

Despite my last statement, I actually like Charlie Adam. What I like most about him is not his “Hollywood Balls,” but his continued effort and confidence in the face of failure. After a succession of bad passes, Adam never ceases to amaze me by still eagerly wanting the ball and continuing to make difficult passes. Against Arsenal, when the penalty was won, Adam enthusiastically ran to take it. Despite taking one of the poorest penalties ever seen against Cardiff, he was committed to atoning for his mistake. I give him credit because many players don’t have the bottle to take that chance with the possibility looming that they might screw up again. Not Charlie Adam.

Unfortunately, beyond his effort and desire, as well as some decent passing, Adam can be shockingly poor. He really is either brilliant or terrible and I can’t seem to figure out what triggers the great performances and what triggers the bad ones. But isn’t this the very same conundrum that has plagued Liverpool all season? Consistency is the buzzword of our campaign and it has yet to be found anywhere we look.

What was missing against Arsenal? Goals, pure and simple. Tactically the team was set out great, they created a whole host of chances, good chances, that were denied by the bar, the goalkeeper, confidence, some bad luck, and some poor finishing. Alas, once again, the story of our season. Does the lack of finishing make this a poor side? Not in my opinion.

Robin Van Persie Showed Liverpool What They Are Painfully Missing With His Clinical Finishing

I love watching Liverpool play when they play like they did against Arsenal, or Chelsea earlier in the season, or Norwich, or Newcastle, or any of the other great games they’ve had. Some of those they’ve won, but many (too many) have been drawn or lost due to some much needed good luck and of course, some clinical finishing. A poignant fact shoved in our faces adding insult to injury by watching Robin Van Persie have two touches, two shots, and two goals all game. What we wouldn’t give for someone like him in the side.

At the beginning of the season, when this pattern of domination and creation, but lack of scoring started to emerge, it felt like only a matter of time before the goals would flow. It’s now March and we’re still waiting. Liverpool have one of the worst chance conversion rates in the league and one of the lowest goal tallies of any Liverpool team in years. It’s shockingly obvious where the problem lies, but I can’t seem to figure out why or when this happened.

The second half of last season saw the Reds regenerated, playing some electric football (the 5-2 against Fulham comes to mind) and scoring plenty of goals. Then the well dried up. With even more attacking threat from a fit Carroll, Suarez, Kuyt, Adam, Downing, Henderson, and Gerrard, the team has scored far less goals and draining confidence began to take its toll. Instead of expecting to score with a shot, they expect to hit the bar or have it saved. How to change this pattern of thinking is up to Kenny and the players.

But it feels like the flood gates are bound to open at any moment. And when that happens, this team will be fairly unstoppable. You combine the great play, possession domination, and some decent finishing and so many of this season’s draws and losses become wins. If results went our way, we would easily be up near Arsenal and pushing toward third.

The most concerning issue Dalglish has at the moment is trying to figure out what his best team is. I still don’t think he, or the team, knows. Combine that with players still getting to know each other, certain players still searching for confidence (Downing, Carroll), and players out from injury (Lucas, Gerrard, Agger), and this season’s results make more sense.

It’s especially disappointing for the fans because every time the team plays well and gets a good result, they do the opposite in the following game or game after. But overall, the team is moving in the right direction. It was always going to take at least a season for this team to be completely overhauled and gel, and the performances show we’re on our way. The only thing missing are the results and all important goals. Not to say those things are easy to change, but there is enough of a platform to jump from at this point.

Some much needed firepower and top class players should be bought in the summer. Why no one was purchased in January is a mystery to me. Newcastle didn’t need any help scoring goals, and they went out and got another striker in January. We have been desperate, and yet for whatever reason, that wasn’t made a priority. This summer, it must.

At this point, the only good thing about ostensibly being out of the fight for fourth place is that perhaps the team can relax and play without pressure. This is what they did in the second half of last season, and they played fantastically well because they really had nothing to lose. You get the feeling this season that a lot of the new and younger players have felt the enormous pressure that comes with playing for Liverpool and it has hindered their confidence and performances. Take away that pressure, and we might just push it close. And let’s not forget winning the FA Cup which is still a genuine possibility.

It’s absolutely been a season of two steps forward and one step back, but we are slowly inching our way forward and playing better and better as the season has gone on, as well as already securing one of only four trophies on offer every season (one of three if you’re not in Europe). I have complete faith in Kenny Dalglish and the players to get things right. I, like many other fans, just need to accept it might take longer than we wanted it to. Such is being a fan and such is being a fan of Liverpool at the moment. But I believe the most important thing is we are moving forward and the future continues to look bright. After all, at the end of the storm, there’s a golden sky. So let’s walk on until the end of the season, giving the team our support every step of the way, whether it be forward or backward.

Liverpool, Suarez, and Why I Think Dalglish is King

By , January 4, 2012 5:19 pm

Please excuse my lengthy piece on the matter, as I realize the whole Suarez affair has been extremely upsetting and exhausting for everyone involved with Liverpool Football Club. And most of all, for Luis Suarez himself. One of the major issues with everything that has happened since that fateful day back in October is the way it has drawn whole sections of England and even Liverpool fans apart. You may agree with what I have to say, or not. Either way, I will respect your opinion even if I don’t believe it myself. This is much the case with the FA, but I am personally having a more difficult time than some accepting the way they’ve handled this case, dished out its punishment, and gave reasons for their decision based on the term ‘probably.’ I am also finding some of Liverpool’s handling of the case poor, in only so much as to how Suarez was represented. I firmly believe Liverpool’s players and Kenny Dalglish have done everything right in their support of Suarez, and I salute their bravery in the face of countless media articles, opposition fans, and even anti-racist organizations turning on them. This must be acknowledged, because as much as some people simply want Liverpool to just roll over and move on, like they would have done under the previous regime, it’s nice to know the team will stick by someone, believing 100% in their innocence whether others do or not.

I read the 115 page FA report, cutting into my New Year’s Eve festivities to do so. At first, I found the reading to be very uncomfortable with the allegations about what Suarez said. It wasn’t pretty, and I thought after the first few pages that Suarez may in fact be a truly awful person despite all obvious evidence to the contrary (mostly referring to his jovial nature, electric smile, and passion for the game. He may be snarky at times, but that is what makes him a great player, not necessarily a horrible human being.)

But as I continued to read, I began to feel puzzled, confused, then I started to laugh. I was laughing at the ridiculousness of the claims, the lack of corroborative evidence, and the pure lack of evidence at all. When I finished page 115, I kept scanning back thinking I had missed something. But no. The FA had no real evidence on which to base their judgements on. Simply that they somehow found Evra a more convincing and reliable witness than Suarez, even though Evra was not the one on trial, therefore Suarez is found guilty of racially abusing him, but is also not a racist. Confused yet? I was, and still am.

Who Do You Believe When So Much Is At Stake?

Before I go any further, I’d like to point to some other articles that have broken down and analyzed the report, as well as some other articles on the subject. I agree with their sentiments, and while I’d be happy to do the breakdown myself, I would just be repeating what others have already said very succinctly. A great piece by Stuart Gilhooly, the solicitor for the Professional Footballers Association of Ireland, can be read here. A few great pieces on the Anfield Wrap here, here, and here. This post by @joescouse_LFC is also a great read regarding the breakdown of the report’s numerous inconsistencies. Plus the excellent language dissection by Professor in Hispanic Studies at Brown University, Aldo Mazzucchelli here. (Also, while in the middle of writing this piece, Paul Tomkins has of course trumped me with his own excellent article here. A must read, and so much of it I agree with).

Any logical person who has read the report, Liverpool fan or otherwise, can see the glaring inconsistencies and bias that is there. And when I say bias, don’t misunderstand that I think the FA and all of the footballing world have it in for Liverpool. While it sometimes does appear that way, I simply mean bias in the FA’s strong correlation between Evra’s events and the truth, despite no evidence or witnesses to support it. And of course, because the FA published its reasoning, the media takes that as word on high that they must be right, no matter how flawed their reasoning is and no matter how many times they use the word ‘probably’ or some variation thereof.

There are two things that some have casually mentioned, but that I find astoundingly atrocious when reading that report. The first is the FA explaining that while they believe Suarez is categorically NOT a racist, they basically explain his comment to Evra simply as ‘heat-of-the-moment’ and ‘we’re all a bit racist sometimes.’ I am appalled at this comment and the logic with which it is brought about.

From the horse’s mouth:

Paragraph 342: We asked ourselves whether a player (Suarez) with this background would make the comments that Mr Evra alleged. We took all these points fully on board and thought long and hard about them before finding the Charge proved. We dealt with them in the following way.

Paragraph 343: Mr Suarez’s background as described by him in his statement raised doubts in our minds, in the first instance, as to whether he would ever make the alleged comments. We recognised that Mr Suarez’s background together with the seriousness of the Charge, meant that a greater burden of evidence was required to prove the Charge. We formed the view that, overall, the preponderance of the evidence favoured the FA’s case.

And here’s the kicker, Paragraph 344: We took into account the fact that it is a real albeit unattractive trait of human nature that we all act from time to time, to greater or lesser degrees, in ways which may be out of character. This is especially so when we feel under pressure, or challenged, or provoked, or pushed into a corner. We do and say things that we are not proud of and regret, and that we might try and deny, sometimes even to ourselves. We occasionally do or say things that we would be embarrassed to admit to family or friends. It is not inconsistent to have black colleagues and friends and relatives, and yet say things to strangers or acquaintances about race or colour that we would not say directly to those closer to us.

And their incomprehensible conclusion, Paragraph 345: Bearing these considerations in mind, whilst we were initially doubtful that Mr Suarez would make the comments alleged by Mr Evra, we proceeded on the basis that the factors relied on in relation to Mr Suarez’s background and experiences did not mean that he could not or would not act in this way. We weighed these considerations together with all the evidence when asking ourselves whose account was more probable.

Why am I appalled by this part of the report? Because the FA has basically said that people in a highly tense situation will of course say something racist, but would never say the same things to their best friends of another race because that would be too embarrassing. This is so insulting and bizarre to me, someone who despises racism and prejudice in all its forms. And the fact they can come up with the conclusion that despite Suarez having NO history of anything he was being accused of, having a grandfather that is black, playing with black players, and being involved in a charity that supports and encourages young black and white children to play together and stamp out racism, they STILL believed that he must have said what Evra alleged. If anything, with all their decisions based on ‘probabilities’ and ‘likelihood’s’ this would make Suarez LESS likely and ‘probably’ impossible to racially abuse someone in the way he is being accused of.

The second of the astounding atrocities is the confusing manner in which the FA on one hand defends Suarez, giving him some benefit of the doubt when it comes to his limited use of the English language and the way he may feel nervous at having to defend his good name in light of such serious charges. Yet, they neither seem to care or believe that those two things could be why there were some inconsistencies in what he said. And on the flip side, the way that he speaks his own language has somehow been summarily dismissed as wrong because Evra, someone with the ability to converse in Spanish, but by all means not fluent, especially in Suarez’s dialect, claims Suarez said something that Suarez refutes. Personally, I’m going to believe the person who grew up speaking that language and is fluent in it, but obviously the FA does not.

On that note, as many others have stated in the articles I linked to above, despite what you may believe, I am not defending a ‘racist’ in my defense of Luis Suarez. Accusations like this are beyond me. The club, manager, players, and many fans believe he is innocent of the allegations of being a racist and using racist language. The part where many people differ is their understanding and the importance they give to the idea that there may be – brace yourself – cultural and language differences between two different cultures and languages. I know this may be hard to grasp for some, especially it seems from the English speaking countries like England, but it’s true. I think we can all agree that Spanish and English are undeniably two different languages. There, I’ve said it. Get out your pitch forks and start lynching.

A great comment was made by Glynn on The Anfield Wrap’s article Suarez: Why the Guilty Verdict Was Correct stating, “That’s a fairly reasonable article, however, like the media at large, you also are taking the English literal meaning of the five letter word which Luis has admitted using (negro) and presenting it as proof of Luis’s guilt. There’s no attempt to explore the meaning in the cultural-linguistic context in which it was originally used – and that this is dismissed as not even being worthy of discussion smacks of xenophobic arrogance.” This is excellently stated, and concisely explains what I said above.

On this basis, I just cannot understand how people keep pointing to the fact that Suarez admitted using a word, which to him is completely harmless and not only not racist, but not insulting either, as clear evidence that he’s guilty of racially abusing Evra. Think about it for a second. If everything we said in one language was insulting to someone in another, we’d all be apologizing everyday for everything we say. Doesn’t the FA’s logic on this seem completely illogical?

Many also keep pointing out that: ‘ignorance is not an excuse.’ Really? It is a perfectly good one to me when Suarez, by his own admission of using the word, clearly had no intention of insulting or racially abusing Evra. Because if he did have those intentions, it would be much easier to lie and profess that he said nothing at all. And if what he admitted to saying was misconstrued by Evra as something racist, how is that Suarez’s fault? He was honest (perhaps too honest seeing how horribly he’s been treated over all this) in saying what he said because he felt he had nothing to hide. I, as I’m sure many others, have also done this in their lifetime; been honest in a situation where we had nothing to hide, but were found guilty of something anyway because of the way it was perceived by someone else.

If this was such a grievous mistake made by Suarez, then shouldn’t the powers-that-be have done the right thing in just explaining to Suarez that despite him speaking in his own language, they found it abusive and therefore unacceptable? Giving him a one-game ban and explaining to Liverpool and every other club that foreigners need to be given better lessons on understanding the culture they are now living in? Surely this kind of scenario should have been sufficient for anyone even if it does reek of xenophobia.

Perhaps if Evra had attempted to discuss what he thought he heard with Suarez, the ref, and the managers before making the accusations to a television channel, then Suarez would have easily been able to apology for any misunderstanding and clearly explain what he meant in saying what he did. People have told me I’m foolish for thinking of this and it could never be an option. And clearly a logical, sound, and rational approach to all this from the FA was also never an option after reading their report. I don’t know how I could be so silly as to think that they would be any of those things with such a serious charge being made.

To comment on current rumblings, in regard to those in the media, Man United corner, and any opposition or Liverpool fans that agree with the notion that Suarez should now apologize for what he’s done, let me say this. Saying he should apologize is an outrageous thing to ask when they are referring to an apology for making a racist remark, which he categorically denies he did. If anything, maybe an apology for the simple misunderstanding on the part of Evra, but never, NEVER should he be made to apologize for something he didn’t do which is racially abuse Evra. From my own negative experience of a similar situation to Suarez’s, where I was being accused of all kinds of outlandish things by people around me, none of which I was guilty of, did I ever think that apologizing was right. I knew in my heart of hearts that I did nothing wrong, and at the end of the day if someone else felt otherwise, that truly was their problem and not mine. I think Suarez feels much the same as he continues to deny doing anything malicious or racist in any way, shape, or form.

I’ll make two more comments about this whole sad and sorry affair.

First, I’m not excusing some of Liverpool’s misguided tactics in all this. It seems to become more and more clear that their handling of the situation as far as preparedness of Suarez and other witnesses, as well as the lawyers chosen were perhaps not the best. So many on various websites, forums, and twitter have been able to logically dispute so much of what was said it’s almost incomprehensible that an institution as big as Liverpool didn’t have the absolute best representation in their corner. They seemed to have screwed up royally in some ways that made it difficult for Suarez to truly defend himself.

But this is also not to say that I think what Dalglish and the team has done was ever wrong. Obviously the media see the support of Suarez’s manager, teammates, and fans as blind favoritism and in turn they are of course supporting a racist, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Dalglish, to his great credit, has stood by his player in the face of criticism from every corner. Read the transcription of his press conference after the Manchester City game here and you can see that he is defiant and still 100% believes in Suarez’s innocence, while also condemning the ‘blind’ favoritism the FA and media have for Evra. This is what makes Dalglish so brilliant, and why Liverpool fans will always see him as the king. While Suarez may be young, and relatively unknown to the British footballing world, Dalglish is not. Anyone that doubts his sincerity and integrity throughout his prominent career as a player and manager is sorely mistaken.

Which brings me to my second point. I want everyone to imagine being in this situation themselves. If your good name was sullied across the country in every national newspaper, blog, Twitter account, Facebook page, and forum, and you knew yourself to be completely innocent of what was being said, would you not try and fight for yourself? Would you not expect those closest to you, who know you better than everyone and who know the truth as you do to stand up for you in every way they can? Perhaps I find this more difficult than most as I’ve been in a similar personal situation where I had ONE person on my side, and no matter how hard I fought, how hard I tried to prove what was said about me was untrue, and how much I pointed to the past as an example of why those things would never be true, no one believed me. Sometimes it’s easier for people to believe one thing over another based on their own prejudices, biases, and mistakes they’ve made in the past by projecting their negative (and ill-informed judgements) onto others. I would hope that most would want the same support Suarez has received if they were in his shoes, and would also offer it to someone they truly believed was innocent. By all means let’s “Kick Out Racism” from the game, but not by slandering someone based on no evidence, who is most likely innocent if not completely misunderstood in this situation.

To conclude, I feel for Luis Suarez more than anything. Neither him, nor Liverpool, and even to a certain extent Evra and Man United, have come out of this smelling like roses. But Suarez is the one that has to live with these unfounded accusations the rest of his life and especially his footballing career.

Not only that, but say a scenario occurs in the near future, maybe next season, or two seasons down the road where an opposition player is having a torrid time against Suarez, much the way Evra was having on the day in question, or felt aggrieved at a decision that went in Suarez’s favor against him, and he felt in the heat of the moment to accuse Suarez of racial abuse after the match. Despite it not being at all true, and simply based on this player’s word, the FA will look to this current case and decision as an easy way to convict Suarez again and have him permanently suspended. Serve the ban, pay the fine, whatever. But this isn’t a case of a bad tackle where a player serves his suspension and it is easily forgotten and never brought up as evidence next time he makes a challenge, a challenge which can easily be proved on video evidence. This is the man’s career at stake on the word of someone else. A word with no evidence behind it. A word that has yet to be corroborated. By anyone.

And just as this incident was ‘proven’ based on one man’s word against another (despite the FA so cutely saying that this just wasn’t the case), what’s to say that won’t happen again? No one has believed Suarez thus far despite nothing against him holding water, so even less evidence is bound to find him guilty too. This is what I find most disturbing and worrying for Suarez’s future as a world-class player. So forgot how you feel about Suarez, forget he plays for Liverpool, or whether or not you deem him a racist, forget the ban and the fine. Simply think about how easily he was found guilty based on one other person’s word and how easily that could happen to you, your star player, your wife, brother, parents, or child. Then see if you’ll feel the same way Liverpool did in their defense of Luis Suarez.

Dalglish Has The Right Attitude

By , August 26, 2011 12:37 pm

I understand priorities. I deal with them everyday. Deciding what is more important and what to deal with first, second, third, etc. is a daily occurrence for most people. So it doesn’t surprise me that football managers prioritize too. They decide what game is more important and what players to start. Depending on the importance of the game, that can determine who plays and why.

A lot of fans as well as the media often jumped on Benitez’s back for all his prioritizing. It was obvious he focused his sights on Europe. So much so that it gave the impression he wasn’t as concerned about the league or the domestic cups.

I can’t lie, I too was frustrated watching Fernando Torres rested in a league match if there was a Champions League game to think about. Because it seemed that points were often dropped due to this and while a great cup run is always wonderful, Liverpool fans are ready for the focus to be on the league (and all domestic fronts in general).

This season poses an interesting set of circumstances. As we all know, Liverpool will not be competing on four fronts. Europe was too far a reach last season, and whether good or bad, we are not in European competition.

Some see this is as a great opportunity to focus on the league, and the domestic cups. With no European distractions (and even more importantly, no European hangover), the team should realistically be able to field strong starting XIs for just about every game.

If Benitez didn’t have Europe to contend with, perhaps he would have given more thought to the league and started his best team every week. It’s hard to say.

But one thing I will say about Dalglish’s approach so far this season, which was evident following Wednesday’s win in the Carling Cup, is that he isn’t afraid to field a strong side in a game that might not be deemed as important as another. When many teams believe the competition isn’t worth their time, and it’s silly to risk first team players, Dalglish believes otherwise.

“We said before the game we’d make changes. But we also said it shouldn’t be taken in any way, shape, or form as a sign of being disrespectful towards Exeter or the Carling Cup. We are Liverpool Football Club and we will try to win every game that we’ve got to play.”

Dalglish continued, “I think the most important thing was our attitude to the game and I think we started it in the right frame of mind.”

Dalglish’s quotes concisely encapsulate how I feel about Liverpool. I’m not an advocate of the attitude of being disgruntled or annoyed by “lesser” competitions like the Europa League or Carling Cup. I want Liverpool to be playing in and winning everything they possibly can because that’s what this club is all about.

Argue all you want about how the team needs to build back up to being a stronger squad in order to not have to prioritize so much. But my feeling has been and always will remain that “We are Liverpool Football Club and we will try to win every game that we’ve got to play.”

Nice to see my manager feels the same way.

Let The Transfers Begin

By , June 8, 2011 12:48 pm

With the news of Liverpool Football Club signing Sunderland’s 20-year-old star Jordan Henderson, the transfers have officially begun. Many in the media are already bemoaning the hefty transfer fee of what is said to be £20 million for the talented youngster. But the club wasted no time in sealing their first transfer deal of the summer and no matter what, with this bold and logical approach of snapping up Britain’s best talent, Liverpool will be winners. Whether it’s now, or a few years down the line, the strategy Dalglish is implementing will pay off.

The opinions being spouted in the media (and they are only that, opinions), is that Liverpool have now overpaid on potential talents not once, but twice. First in January on Andy Carroll and now in June on Jordan Henderson. Putting aside the fact that everyone must overpay for young English players, such is the inflation and premium they command, Liverpool have not overpaid for anyone just yet.

Buying any player is always a gamble. No one will ever know if the player will fit into the team or not, if they will get injured, if they will perform as well as they have in the past, etc. But buying a young, gifted, English player for perhaps more money than a mid to late 20′s English or foreign one offers two advantages.

The first would be that the potential resale on the player down the line is always going to be higher. Buying a player at 20, getting four or five good years out of them and selling them on for a profit at 25 is a genuine long-term strategy. Key examples of this would be Fernando Torres and David Ngog. Bought young, and sold for massive profits.

The second advantage is the obvious one: they have youth on their side. Of course not every 18, 19, or 20 year-old with amazing potential will succeed in the long run, but they have every opportunity to do so with plenty of time to learn and develop ahead of them.

I won’t pretend that I know a lot about Jordan Henderson right now, but from what I’ve read, he has a wonderful range of passing and the ability to distribute with thought and accuracy. Journalist Iain Macintosh reckons he is of the “Alonso school of play.” Whether he turns out to be as good as Alonso remains to be seen. But the potential is there.

With Henderson, Liverpool have acquired their first big signing of the transfer window. And it would appear that Kenny Dalglish is not stopping there. If rumors and conjecture turn out to be true, than Charlie Adam, Stewart Downing, and Connor Wickham will follow hot on the heels of young Henderson.

The Newest Addition To The New Dalglish Era

The pattern coming into focus with Dalglish and Comolli’s strategy is not just “buy young English players,” but to buy young, gifted, and versatile players. Henderson is essentially a central midfielder, but he can also operate successfully elsewhere. The same goes for Adam, Meireles, Gerrard, Suarez, Kuyt, and Downing. And just look at the ability of Glen Johnson to switch to left-back as if it was his natural position.

The team is being built with and around players that have the ability to not just play one position in one formation, but to play in multiple positions in various formations. This is what creates pass and move football, and this is what Dalglish wants to achieve.

Like everyone else, I have my doubts about players until they have had some time to really prove themselves. On top of this, with Henderson and the others rumored to be added to the squad, I’m not sure how the team will gel and who exactly will be in the starting eleven. But the fact that there will be options and selection headaches is what every big team needs and wants. Liverpool’s squad has been poor over the years and now finally looks set to have genuine strength in multiple areas on the pitch.

Dalglish and Comolli have already taken this team leaps and bounds ahead of where they were last summer. We’ve traded OAP’s for youthful, promising talent. The intent being shown in this transfer window indicates that Liverpool are preparing themselves to once again be a force to be reckoned with. Let the rest of the transfers commence.

What About Adam Johnson?

By , June 6, 2011 2:57 pm

With the summer transfer window open and transfer speculation in full swing, it’s worth taking the time to look at some of the players mentioned in the same breath as Liverpool Football Club. By now we all know the names being bandied about and the level of enthusiasm, anger, and apathy is pretty clear with each one.

Most tend to think that Stewart Downing, now a strong candidate to be a big signing, doesn’t have what it takes to consistently perform in the big games and for a big club. He has his strong points, but most, myself included, feel his weak points may take over when push comes to shove.

There’s also Juan Mata, Charles N’Zogbia, Ashley Young, Charlie Adam, Jordan Henderson, and even radical fantasy possibilities like Alexis Sanchez, Fabio Coentrao, and Eden Hazard. Many of these are examined extremely well and in great detail in Paul Tomkin’s latest subscriber piece “Transfer Views – Creative Midfielders In Focus,” which can be read here. There is also a great piece written by Tony Barret about trusting Kenny Dalglish and Co.’s decision making when it comes to transfers here.

With these and other great articles regarding transfers this summer, my focus is not to rehash much of what’s already been said so well. My question to LFC is: What about Adam Johnson?

Could He Be Headed To Liverpool?

First and foremost, I am a massive fan of Adam Johnson. Having only seen him in Manchester City’s first team this past season and a half, I am already an ardent admirer. The fact that he was excellent against Liverpool back in August really put him on my radar.

In terms of raw ability and pace, Johnson has both in spades. He’s an extremely pacey left-sided winger, with wonderful dribbling skills. He’s confident enough to take defenders on and can score as well. He’s tricky, elusive, and fast. Exactly what LFC have been missing for the last number of years.

Johnson also appears to tick a lot of the new FSG player philosophy boxes. Turning just 24 this summer, he’s young and his peak years are still ahead of him. He has a head start on some other targets by already being settled in the Premier League. And while squad strength will be built this summer with an eye to rotation next season, Johnson would most likely start every game, as long as he stays fit.

According to some of his stats found on Anfield Index, he made 15 starts last season for Man City, while playing a total of 1531 minutes. He scored 4 goals, and had 26 total shots. His goals per game average is not bad with around 3.5 every time he starts. Where he might be lacking is his chance conversion, which is at a mere 15%.

In his first full season with Man City, he put in a total of 108 crosses, with 20 of those being accurate, a cross accuracy of 19%. Again, that’s not a number to get too excited about, but he has five assists for the season. On top of this, Johnson has an average of 2.1 successful dribbles per game. When compared to City’s standout star David Silva who has had the same amount of successful dribbles, but has played 1000 minutes more, you can see Johnson’s potential when getting the chance to play week in and week out.

There are definitely some flaws to Johnson’s game, but he is only 23 and has shown a lot of potential in his one and a half seasons at Man City. With the über rich Sheikh Mansour collecting as many players as possible, Johnson has been edged further out of a starting place. There were some rumblings toward the end of the season that he was becoming frustrated with his lack of first team opportunities and this could be the perfect time to snatch him up.

Johnson is a player that will not only be great for next season, but also, barring injuries, for seasons to come. He has the potential and proven skill to be a brilliant winger, and he may be just what Liverpool needs.

The Wonderful Conundrum of Andy Carroll

By , May 18, 2011 3:33 pm

Putting aside the pretty toothless defeat to Tottenham on Sunday, the second half of the season has been damn swell for Liverpool Football Club. From the brink of relegation in September to fifth place in May, the season has been the epitome of a roller coaster ride. With each crazy turn, people have gotten off (Hodgson, Torres), and more have gotten on (Dalglish, Suarez, Carroll). And while Liverpool may not be able to look forward to European football next year, it is not a loss that will dampen anyone’s spirits too badly. With King Kenny being signed up for three years, the youth team progressing and producing at a rapid pace, and a set of owners willing to do whatever it takes to bring the club back to greatness, the future looks incredibly bright from here on out.

But let’s not get carried away.

I’ll admit that I was allowing myself to get a little carried away over the last few weeks. With stellar performances against Manchester City, Birmingham, and most recently AT Fulham, there were plenty of reasons to start believing we were all but assured the Premier League title next season.

Obviously the game against against Tottenham gave everyone, myself included, a big slap in the face to wake us up to the fact that despite an impressive run of form since January, the club still needs improvement in many areas.

I’m not even sure where exactly the problem was against Tottenham. I felt this was as winnable a game as could be. The recipe for success was as follows: The momentum and confidence surging through the team, combined with Kenny Dalglish’s fresh signature on a three-year contract, and add in the extremely poor form of Tottenham and presto! Three points for the Reds with at least a +2 or +3 goal difference on the day. Unfortunately, it was not to be.

It didn’t make me particularly happy to see the last home game of the season, after such an incredible run of performances and results, end in such a limp defeat. But taking a step back to look at the bigger picture is much more important.

I saw Raul Meireles as a bigger loss in that game than I thought he’d be. That’s not to say I don’t think he’s great when he plays, I just felt the team had enough about them to cope without the Portuguese playmaker. And despite Kenny saying he doesn’t think a change in personnel and formation caused the defeat, I’d like to think it still had a lot to do with it.

Tottenham must also be given credit as, for the first time in months, they decided to actually show up and play their hearts out for a game. Fair play.

Many have suggested it was Andy Carroll’s lumbering, half-fit presence that really did the team in on Sunday. Outside of a handful of decent touches, he was pretty useless overall. He was pedestrian up front, he failed to win headers when challenging Ledley King, and he wasn’t linking up well with his fellow forwards. It almost seemed as though his inclusion on the team was more of a hinderance than an asset on the day.

I’m not denying that Andy Carroll had a poor game against Tottenham, so did a lot of the other players. But going back to the idea that the bigger picture is what is important here, Andy Carroll “the problem” is a problem Liverpool haven’t had for a long time. That is, having a very talented striker to utilize while already having a very potent front line. Finding the formations and systems to get the best out of him is still a new challenge, but one that should be greeted with great joy from anyone supporting LFC.

For too many years Liverpool have relied too heavily on Fernando Torres and Steven Gerrard to score the goals in a very limited formation. Now the team has options and fluidity up front which will only get better after this summer of purchases. If Andy Carroll is a problem to figure out right now, than he’s a wonderful problem I can’t wait for Liverpool to solve.

Liverpool Need To Finish Strong

By , April 27, 2011 12:56 pm

We are now ensconced in the business end of the season, but unfortunately for Liverpool Football Club and its fans, there is really no business to take care of. The season probably finished for most when the club was mired in the relegation zone, along with being dumped out of the Carling Cup by lowly Northampton Town. This has been one of the most incredibly dramatic seasons for Liverpool in a long, long time, and while there may not be silverware or even a place in Europe to show for it, the last four games in the Premier League need to be played as if they are all cup finals.

The club’s roller coaster ride this season has been well documented. From the farcical appointment, rise, and fall of Roy Hodgson, to the near collapse and administration bound point-of-no-return for the club as a whole. Just as darkness appeared to descend on Anfield, the cavalry arrived in the form of American John W. Henry. With a scroll of his pen on a massive check, he wiped away the club’s debt and informed everyone involved that a new era would develop and Liverpool would be back in their place as one of the best sides in world football.

A collective sigh was breathed from Huyton to Mumbai as Liverpool fans from all over the world witnessed a new beginning. Just a few short months later and the horror show that was Roy Hodgson would also be wiped from the club’s collective past, present, and future.

The return of the King made all the headlines in January, until another Kop hero overshadowed even Kenny Dalglish’s long awaited return at the helm of LFC. Fernando Torres made a strange and oft looked at treacherous move away from Anfield, only to find his new home at Chelsea to be anything like the light at the end of the dark tunnel he described after leaving. But enough about him.

With Kenny In Charge, The Club Has Taken A Turn For The Best

January saw, ostensibly, three new signings in the form of Dalglish, Luis Suarez, and Andy Carroll. FSG displayed their intentions for the famed Merseyside club by installing a capable and historically significant man to steward the good-ship LFC and splashing the cash on much needed reinforcements up front. Already a massive success, Suarez looks the business and Carroll, who is yet to fully recover from injury, is still finding his feet better than most believed he would.

It’s almost the end of this sometimes torrid, sometimes shocking, sometimes spectacular season and it would seem that Liverpool need the season to end already to put a lot of the bad memories behind them.

While it would be easier to sit comfortably in a position mid-table, with guns at the ready to aim at the summer transfer window and prepare for next season, this can’t be done. Liverpool need to finish the season strong and prove to themselves and their supporters that they are better than anyone in the media, Roy Hodgson, or anyone else outside the club has given them credit for this season.

There are no trophies, but there is pride at stake. Forget the possibility of still qualifying for the Europa League (or the very outside chance of the Champions League), Liverpool need to do this for them.

Arsenal fans were aghast at their team’s dismal game against LFC, and many were shocked that Liverpool and their fan base were not more willing to just give up in the dying minutes so as to help Arsenal’s chances of taking on Man United for the title.

I don’t know about most of you, but just the thought disgusts me. I would never prefer Liverpool rolling over just to hurt one of our rivals. The thought never crossed my mind, and I don’t think it crossed any of the players’ minds either. That’s why they never gave up until the final whistle and secured what could be an invaluable point.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not happy that Manchester United will win another Championship this year, and overtake Liverpool’s record, but more than anything it should spur the players and club on even more to win that all elusive Premier League title in the years to come and overtake United’s new record. After all, records were meant to be broken.

Once again, while it may seem the club has nothing to fight for, it is just the opposite. The fans give everything to their team and they deserve nothing but the same in return. A strong finish will give the team confidence, attract new players, possibly secure Kenny Dalglish into a permanent manager’s role, and perhaps even garner a place in next season’s Europa League. The positive boost going into the summer in which LFC will be busy in the transfer market and pre-season is unquantifiable and could make all the difference heading into August.

The ups and downs the club has experienced this season have all pointed to one extraordinary thing: a new dawn. New owners, new players, and a new manager will return the club to where it belongs. But until they can get there next season, they need to finish this one right.

Would Liverpool Have Been Worse Off Losing Pepe Reina?

By , February 3, 2011 9:20 pm

Don't Worry, La. I'm Not Going Anywhere

As the debates rage on about Torres and his untimely departure from Liverpool Football Club, an interesting question has started to creep up. There’s no doubt in most supporters’ minds that losing Fernando Torres, no matter how much he didn’t want to play for the club anymore, was a massive blow. The hurt feelings combined with the fact the club would be lacking one of the most talented strikers in the world was always going to be hard to take. Everyone felt used, mistreated, and saddened by his sudden change of heart. In the wake of his new desire to play for another team, fans were so disheartened by the treatment they felt Torres had put them under that they didn’t stop to look at the bigger picture.

Since Torres was, is, and most likely will be a top class striker, for the remainder of his career anyway, it’s easy to see why any club would miss him. But while we all sat around dismayed and disillusioned, the manager and owners were busy working at a way to overcome that feeling of loss. Dalglish couldn’t have said it better than when he told the press, “The football club will always be here, and no person is bigger than this football club.” Right on.

And strikers, while top class ones are always hard to find, are definitely out there. And I personally think the top brass did a magnificent job in acquiring the likes of Andy Carroll and Luis Suarez. The feeling around the club is that the team will be better off in the long run. Goals will keep flowing, and perhaps the burden will now be shared from one to many.

And as we watched all this drama unfold, you had to look around and think: if we had lost another massively important player other than Torres, would we still have been better off? I think the answer to that is no. And the player I’m referring to Liverpool losing is Pepe Reina.

It’s a matter of coincidence that I prepared to write this piece over the last number of days when just this afternoon, Twitter was abuzz with rumors of Pepe ‘apparently’ stating he wants out now as well. And I use apparently because the rumors appeared primarily on Twitter and then one small, what looked like slapped together article in the Metro UK, regarding his desire to leave Liverpool and go to Manchester United. While I am no more in a position than the Metro UK to claim this is true or not, I have to say it all sounds a bit strange.

For all we believed Torres when he said he loved the club and would never leave, I just don’t think Reina is the same kind of person he is. Couple that with the fact that goalkeepers have much longer careers than outfield players (which is why Torres felt he needed to leave now before it was too late), and you just don’t get the sense there’s any merit to the silly rumor. (It seems Simon Clancy and Ben Smith were having a little conversation of their own on the micro-blogging site, nothing but harmless speculation, and somehow the Metro believed this to be word on high regarding the Spaniard’s current position.)

Back to the question at hand. If the fans and the people involved in managing Liverpool had a choice, would they be worse off seeing the back of Fernando Torres, or the back of Pepe Reina? As mentioned before, as sad as most are to see Torres go, I think it’s an easy question to answer.

A quality goalkeeper, as Arsenal knows all too well, gets you about 10 extra points a season. This can be the difference between safety and relegation, European qualification and mid-table mediocrity, and winning the league and coming in second. When losses are turned into draws and draws turned into wins because the man between the sticks makes some world class saves, it becomes more clear that his position may be even more important than the ones scoring the goals.

Don’t misunderstand and think that I’m saying strikers are insignificant, that’s not my point at all. But key to grabbing points is not just up to how many the team scores, but how many you keep out in the end. You’ll never lose a game if you don’t concede a goal and all that.

Reina Has Two Golden Glove Awards And Numerous Broken Records To His Name

After the game against Stoke, two wonderful things happened. First, Liverpool managed to finally gain a positive goal difference. It took 25 games, but at least they got there. Second, and most importantly, Pepe Reina kept another clean sheet, his third in a row to be exact. And on top of that, Reina passed Elisha Scott for third highest clean sheets in LFC history. That’s an amazing feat for a keeper who has only been at the club just over five years, and also managed to beat Ray Clemence’s record of fewest goals conceded in their first 50 games by notching 28 clean sheets in his first 50 appearances. Add to that his two Premier League Golden Glove awards for most clean sheets for three years in succession (three if you count 2008 when he tied Petr Cech), and you see what an incredible asset Reina is.

On top of that, Pepe Reina has the reputation of a lovely and jovial young man. He celebrates more than most when his team wins and score important goals, and he, we’d like to believe, is Liverpool through and through. He has even joked that his kids have scouse accents. The fact that he’s been made captain in the absence of Steven Gerrard and Jamie Carragher speaks volumes about his leadership, commitment, and talent. Gerrard even testified last season as to the immense character of Pepe Reina, and believes that he will indeed one day captain the club.

Reina made his intentions clear last year by signing a contract extension, and committing himself to Liverpool for many years to come. He was one of the first to do so in a season filled with low points, which just goes to show the perseverance and faith he has in Liverpool. He was quoted as saying during the most recent transfer window, when his position at the club may have been in doubt, “Obviously, I want to be part of a team that has the chance to win the title, win major trophies and to play with the best players – but I expect that to happen here at Liverpool, and for the club to return itself to that level. I plan to stick to my contract.” I imagine Pepe might have had one or two things to say to his Spanish compatriot about loyalty before he walked out the backdoor.

At the end of the day, Liverpool Football Club and its fans want players that want to play for them. In Reina they have a world-class talent and loyal servant to the club. If I had to make a choice this past transfer window, as difficult as it would have been, I would have chosen for Reina to stay. And while Liverpool may once again be fooled into taking a player’s word as his bond, you get that feeling that Pepe means it – really.

Liverpool Transfer Saga 2011: Adios Torres, Hello Carroll And Suarez

By , February 1, 2011 12:06 am

It’s amazing what can happen in football in the span of a few days. As I sit and reflect on what turned into a turbulent weekend for Liverpool Football Club, it’s hard to decipher through all the mixed emotions. There have been ups, there have been downs, and there has been a lot of anxiety in between waiting to find out which one was coming next. In the end, the January transfer window closed with us saying goodbye to a player who disappointed many with the manner of his departure, creating a gaping hole in our collective heart where the love for him used to be. And while this pain may be the legacy he has left behind, it’s much more important to now look to the future.

Cue Andy Carroll and Luis Suarez. Don’t worry; I will get back to Fernando Torres, as his becoming an official Chelsea player does not mean he’s nothing to do with Liverpool at all anymore. But for now, I’m going to focus on the positive, and for the first time in a long time, there is a lot to be positive about.

This is the first transfer window in eons that Liverpool has been truly involved in. Let’s just step back for a minute and appreciate this. I know many fans (especially those at other clubs that don’t quite understand LFC or know what we’ve gone through) are quick to point out the massive transfer fees splashed out by club owners FSG in the last few days. Many are saying the £55 million or so was a ridiculous amount spent on two largely unproven strikers, one who last played in Holland, and one who just entered his maiden year in the Premier League. But when studied a little more closely, they may just prove correct and perhaps in time, a bargain.

Let’s first look at Luis Suarez. He’s a young (24), versatile striker who can play off a central striker, on the wing, or in a partnership. Anyone who has watched videos of his goals on YouTube can attest to his natural and predatory striking ability. He’s quick, he’s feisty, and he has a hunger to play at Liverpool. He arrived at the club thrilled to be there and has since been caught on film at Melwood with an enormous smile plastered on his face.

A Beaming Luis Suarez Can't Wait To Play For Liverpool

He is quoted as saying in his first official interview as a player, “I’m very happy to be here, to me this is the most important club not just in England, but in the whole world.” He claims to have watched Liverpool as a boy and followed the English league, while also pointing out that the Liverpool fans are the greatest in England. He says it’s a dream to play there. There’s not much more you can want from a new star signing, and Luis has endeared himself to the fans almost immediately with his warmth and excitement for the club. His goal scoring record speaks for itself with 49 goals in all competitions for Ajax in the 2009-10 season. It remains to be seen whether he can replicate this sort of form in England, but he looks to be a fearsome and electrifying prospect.

Andy Carroll, the other new addition about to don the famous number nine shirt, came as a bit of a surprise to Liverpool and its fans. With Torres so abruptly putting in a transfer request at the end of the window, it left Dalglish and Co. scrambling. In the circumstances, you might expect some rash and silly decisions to be made. Liverpool needed a replacement striker fast with Torres on his way out, but FSG was not about to throw away all their plans on building for the future simply because they had little time to make a snap decision. They were never going to buy just anyone, even if it was with one eye on the summer to make the real purchase. Bringing in the right player was paramount, but FSG also had an opportunity to make a real statement of intent.

When the name Carroll was first mentioned, I was skeptical. Although he has shown a lot of skill over the first few months of the season, this was still Carroll’s first time in the Premier League. And immediately the colossal transfer fee Liverpool offered for him took me aback. But once I had some time to look past the inflated fee (some of which is due to the Man City effect, some due to the fact he is English), I was able to see the potential of the player. For starters, he is a mere 22-years-old, and only just turned 22 this month. He has the ability to play well for a number of years to come and if successful, could potentially offer Liverpool a sizable return on their investment should they wish to sell in the future.

Dalglish Welcomes Liverpool's New Number Nine

According to Kevin Keegan, Carroll is one of the three best headers of the ball he’s ever seen. He’s big, he’s strong, and he’s also technically sound with his feet. Watching him earlier this season, you could see the way he was able to use his strength to power into the box, challenge extremely well for headers, and score some lovely goals, of which he already has 11. From the initial evidence, you get the feeling that he has a lot of the skill Torres has, combined with dominant heading prowess, and most of all, the ability to hold the ball and link up play. For all Torres’ strengths, the latter was never his cup of tea.

What could also prove quite exciting is something else Torres lacked: the ability to play as part of a strike partnership. With the attributes of both new strikers, it seems clear they have the opportunity to compliment each other very well. Carroll could play up on his own with Suarez on one side and Maxi, Kuyt, Cole, Jovanovic, or Gerrard flanking the other, but the pair could be lethal with Suarez playing just in behind. With Carroll’s ability to hold up play and create around the box, coupled with Suarez’s finishing and ability to join in the play, the partnership is starting to seem mouthwatering.

And how it all comes full circle is the partnership of Torres and Suarez was also looking quite tasty before Torres’ oddly timed decision to leave was thrust onto the club. Upon more reflection, it’s key to remember that Torres was never very good at playing in a partnership. All the times it was tried with him at Liverpool, nothing ever seemed to work. And for those that say the surrounding players at Liverpool just aren’t good enough, then what excuse can be made when Torres plays with Spain, up front with David Villa, and always looks out of place and ineffective?

This begs the question of how the Spaniard will fit into the Chelsea system. With Drogba, a player who is also used to playing up front on his own, it will be interesting to see how the two combine. And this means of course that Anelka will have to be dropped to make way for the new striker. Or perhaps Drogba will be dropped. Or maybe even one of the coveted midfielders of Lampard, Essien, or Malouda. Abramovich may have been keen to finally get the prize he’s always wanted, but Chelsea manager Carlo Ancelotti may not be thanking him anytime soon for the re-think he will have to do with his squad.

As was mentioned in the previous post regarding Torres’ poorly timed (and possibly ill-advised) decision to leave Liverpool, Chelsea are an aging team looking more on the verge of a slide rather than an ascent. While they may continue to have an inordinate amount of funds to invest, they will need to replace the most important positions on the team, all at the same time, very soon.

This is compounded by the fact that Torres will turn 27 before long and could very well have played his best days at Liverpool. Take Michael Owen as an example of a striker who has looked a shadow of the player he once was. His speed was exhilarating to watch, and while his finishing skills have never really waned, the consistent injuries and time on the sidelines has affected him mentally and physically. Speedy players tend to burn out younger as their hamstrings continue to give way more easily. The evidence of this was clear the last 18 months or so with Torres, and Liverpool fans had to put up with a number of spells of him injured or lacking in confidence due to his injuries. This was always something that should be a concern for Chelsea, and one they might be worried about sooner rather than later.

It’s with a heavy heart that I say goodbye to Fernando Torres, and at this moment in time, I’m not quite ready to forgive and move on. I believe the way he handled his departure from the club was unprofessional and disrespectful to everyone at Liverpool, especially the fans. The timing, the motivation, and the exact reasons for his desire to leave a team that idolized him are still not clear, and it will be an interesting few weeks ahead as some of the truth comes out.

At the end of the day, it’s a shame that Torres couldn’t see to give Dalglish and the new owners until at least the end of the season to prove him wrong about Liverpool moving in the right direction. That is of course if we are to believe his main reason for joining Chelsea is to win trophies. He tarnished what could have been legendary status at the club, similar to the one the current manager still has. In my opinion, I feel he will one day regret the decision he has made (if he hasn’t already), and he will have no one to blame but himself.

Even Ryan Babel, a much maligned and indifferent player to most of the fans left with parting words of appreciation and gratitude for his time at Liverpool, even going so far as to say he wishes everyone at Liverpool luck and hopes they end up in the top four where they belong. Torres’ parting words, as he joins Chelsea tonight, so far have been, ”This is the target for every footballer. To try to play at one of the top-level clubs in the world and I can do it now.” Make of that what you will, but as his respectability amongst Liverpool fans is currently rock bottom, not even mentioning the club and his time there strikes yet another cruel blow.

It’s difficult to say when I’ll be able to look at Torres with appreciation and respect once more. I’m sure it will happen one day, but the way in which he deserted the team when it had a bright future to offer him is still fresh in my mind.

But what is important now are the two new players that have joined Liverpool today. Andy Carroll and Luis Suarez are the future of the football club. And as Kenny Dalglish said in his laconic comment today regarding players, “The most important people at Liverpool Football Club are the people who want to be here.” And right now, those people are two young lads named Luis and Andy. Welcome to Liverpool.

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